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Up & Coming

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THURSDAY 10/28

OF MONTREAL, JANELLE MONAE

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

IOA, ALLO DARLIN', BRIGHT ARCHER

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Read our article on Allo Darlin'.

WOW AND FLUTTER, LOOKBOOK, YELTSIN

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Wow and Flutter.

SUPER XX MAN, KEEP YOUR FORK THERE'S PIE, MIKE COYKENDALL

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) The latest installment from Super XX Man—actually one Scott Garred, who's been recording as Super XX Man since 1995—is named Vol. XIII White Bed and serves as a touching farewell to Mr. XX Senior. Garred's father succumbed to cancer in 2008, and that loss is all over White Bed, a generous, heartfelt, and uplifting tribute that showcases Garred's nimble skill with a tune and a lyric. That's not the only goodbye on White Bed, either; "Peter and Paul" is about a "high torque super pooch named Harriet" who is no longer with us. It's a testament to Garred's songwriting skill that, despite these goodbyes, White Bed isn't a bleak, forlorn listen. Rather, it's an excellent record, an affecting and even joyful one that never gets bogged down in sentimentality. NED LANNAMANN

DEERHUNTER, REAL ESTATE, CASINO VS. JAPAN

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Deerhunter has perfected its "ambient punk" over the course of four full-lengths and a pair of EPs; there probably hasn't been a band since Radiohead to seamlessly marry modern technology with flesh-and-blood rock and roll this well. Bradford Cox—the consummate music geek and mastermind—takes the lo-fi bedroom noise of his Atlas Sound project and works it into some of the best garage pop of the last five years. Deerhunter's latest Halcyon Digest is chock-full of pop hooks and ambient bleeps—sounds that would seem out of place in the hands of anyone else. But Cox shouldn't get all of the credit; guitarist-vocalist Lockett Pundt delivers the album's best six minutes with "Desire Lines." Live, the band is always a force to be reckoned with. MARK LORE

JOE PUG AND THE HUNDRED MILE BAND, NICK FREITAS, LEONARD MYNX

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) At this point, our love of Joe Pug is a poorly kept secret. And while the Chicago troubadour's first full-length album, Messenger, is among this year's finest straight-up singer/songwriter records, it's nothing compared to his captivating live show. Armed with a guitar and a slender but riveting collection of songs, Pug imprints himself in both your brain and your heart, and this time around his Hundred Mile Band will be backing him up. Meanwhile, Nick Freitas is a fine songwriter in his own right—2008's unforgettable Sun Down album sounded like the best Paul Simon album since the mid-'80s—and his stints with Conor Oberst's Mystic Valley Band show that certain heavyweights are paying attention. The title track from his latest, the Center of the World EP, finds him stretching his excellent songcraft over a cheese-synth framework, and effectively so. NL

BEST COAST, SONNY AND THE SUNSETS, THE RESERVATIONS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) It might be cliché to compare Best Coast's debut LP Crazy for You to Tiger Trap, but a fuzzy female-led indie pop band suggests few other comparisons. There are serious similarities: charged female vocals, washed-out guitars, and unabashed "I-like-you-but-I'm-not-sure-these-feelings-are-mutual" lyrics. But the sound is lazier than the Trap's and the music is almost defiantly immature and lo-fi as well. Crazy for You's standout track, "Boyfriend"—which is actually sort of melodically reminiscent of the chorus to the Rubinoos song "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend" and Avril Lavigne's so-similar-she-got-sued "Girlfriend"—is a reminder that tasteful simplicity and directness are often more effective than lyrical complexity. So yeah, Best Coast's Bethany Cosentino may not use many tier-three words, but who cares when the tunes are so damn infectious? MORGAN TROPER

MISSISSIPPI MAN, THE HEAD AND THE HEART, THE SHIVAS, NORMAN

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) To judge solely by their name, Mississippi Man are yet another California band reappropriating Southern rock. But while Creedence Clearwater Revival ended up finding their own route through the bayou, Mississippi Man mainly end up sounding a lot like their peers from all over the country—if you don't think of Philly's Dr. Dog or San Diego's Delta Spirit when listening to Mississippi Man's first full-length record, A-OK, then you probably haven't heard either Dr. Dog or Delta Spirit. Not that these are bad bands to be compared to, but neither of them could be accused of reinventing the wheel. Meanwhile, Seattle band the Head and the Heart recently won a fan in the form of jam-meister Dave Matthews, who was spotted at a recent show. Can a signing to ATO Records be far behind? NL

CYNTHIA NELSON BAND

(Mississippi Pizza, 3552 N Mississippi) Before there was Tara Jane O'Neil the solo artist, there was Retsin. One of the great—yet overlooked—indie acts of yore, Retsin was the collaboration between O'Neil and partner Cynthia Nelson. Split for nearly a decade, Retsin gave way to a pair of solo careers; Nelson is already on her third LP, In a Lab, which is due out tonight. Piano-heavy with haunting melodies—Mary Timony fans will adore this—In a Lab trots out a series of respected Portland musicians to lend a hand (from Katy Davidson of Dear Nora to members of Evolutionary Jass Band), but ultimately it's the music of the sweet-voiced Nelson that is on display here. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

FRIDAY 10/29

TU FAWNING, AAN, BILLYGOAT

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Tu Fawning.

SUFJAN STEVENS

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) The Age of Adz—a spectacular departure from Sufjan Stevens' strummy, effervescent, and bookish Illinois—is a spiral of regret, confusion, and lost love, coated in a swirl of synths and glitchy electronica. Adz is a breakup record. Or, as Stevens told the New York Times, the sound of "my physical body, my feelings, touch, the nerves, anxiety, the chemistry of the brain and the spinal fluid." It appears as if, since the release of Illinois in 2005, Stevens came close to cracking up, both personally and creatively. The resulting Adz (pronounced "odds") is chilly, blunt, raw, and often devastating. It takes time to get used to. But by God, Adz is also brilliant, and establishes Stevens' artistic range as infinitely wider and more intriguing. Here's hoping it brings him the same catharsis as it does me. ANDREW R TONRY Also see My, What a Busy Week!

THE PARSON RED HEADS, JAMES APOLLO, HUNTER PAYE

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) While the band is so new to Portland that they probably still can't properly pronounce "Willamette," the Parson Red Heads are adjusting just fine. They've kept their ginger heads to the ground, working diligently on their as-of-yet untitled full-length, which was recorded in both Los Angeles with pedal steel player Raymond Richards (he's recorded Local Natives) and North Carolina with former Big Star collaborator Chris Stamey (he's recorded Whiskeytown). Place your future bets for 2011 pop dominance on the Red Heads. Until then, just enjoy this headlining show from the band. EAC

K'NAAN, PAPER TONGUES

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Even if your fleeting stint as a soccer supporter died when Clint Dempsey walked off the pitch, chances are you heard "Wavin' Flag" from K'Naan. (If you missed it, you are alone.) Thanks to the biggest sporting event on the planet, and the deep pockets of head sponsor Cola-Cola, the song went platinum in multiple countries—including going gold in India. Not bad for a Somali-born emcee who cut his teeth in the Canadian hiphop scene. Granted, that version of "Wavin' Flag" was defanged of its political slant, something K'Naan surely won't do tonight. While so much hiphop is limited to a few-block radius of neighborhood-centric rhymes, K'Naan will effortlessly crisscross the globe in the series of a few short verses. Bring a passport. EAC

CATTLE DECAPITATION, DEVOURMENT, KNIGHTS OF THE ABYSS, BURNING THE MASSES, SON OF AURELIUS, SLAUGHTERBOX, OCEAN OF MIRRORS

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) Cattle Decapitation is a death/grind metal band with an agenda that goes further than offensive noise and content. Sure, they have an indecipherable logo, schizophrenic riffs, and graphic album covers that are banned in several countries, but underneath all the band's violent misanthropy, there's a bunch of sweethearts who just wanna do good by the Earth and all its furry little creatures. In one of their previous visits to town, vocalist Travis Ryan spoke of the band's love for Portland because of its food, pot, and recycling system. Each member of the band is a vegetarian and their official website has links to Friends of Animals, Spay USA, and the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement ("May we live long and die out"). It's refreshing to hear a gore-obsessed band that wants to do more than just make you physically ill. ARIS WALES

CLOROX GIRLS, THE MEAN JEANS, CHEMICALS, BILL COLLECTORS, THERAPISTS

(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) There's no better time than Halloween weekend for the Clorox Girls to rise from the dead, dust off their denim, and headline an All Hallow's Eve throwdown. The one-time Portland garage-pop sensation—2007's J'aime Les Filles has aged surprisingly well—has been dormant for a couple years as frontman Justin Maurer strayed with side project dalliances under the moniker Suspect Parts. But tonight, they return. Joining them will be de facto party kings the Mean Jeans, who'll kick you in the nuts if you show up tonight without a costume. They'll likely do the same to those in costumes as well. EAC

SATURDAY 10/30

AVI BUFFALO, WAMPIRE

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Every time I go to my grandparents' house, they ask me to lift something heavy, write HTML code for their computer, or open that jar of pickled herring they've been trying to pry apart for weeks. "We've got arthritis! Our eyes are bad!" "You're young, you can handle it!" I equate this youthful plague to the touring capacity displayed by (and imposed upon) Long Beach-based, barely 20-year-old Avi Buffalo thus far. Since the April release of their self-titled debut, the band has barely had time to brood in their rooms and skip dinner to prove a point; they've been too busy doing their geography homework for the gifted-and-talented rock prodigy class they've enrolled in. And for the last leg of their first headlining tour, they partake in another laborious load-in, slinging their jangly, dreamy, and appropriately heavy guitar rock to Portland for our listening pleasure. But they're young. They can handle it. RAQUEL NASSER Also see My, What a Busy Week!

PIERCED ARROWS, NAPALM BEACH, THE OBITUARIES, EASTSIDE SPEED MACHINE, DON'T, IRON LORDS

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) The final countdown continues for Satyricon, which will live out its final days the way it always has—bringing underground rock bands into its dingy digs. But tonight's (second-to-last) show might actually make you feel like you've fallen into the most kickass wormhole ever. Fred and Toody Cole come this time as Pierced Arrows rather than Satyricon staples Dead Moon. Joining them is seminal Portland punk band Napalm Beach, who haven't played a show in years. The place will no doubt be packed full of people who frequented the venue back in its heyday, as well as young folks who need to see what the hubbub is/was all about. Deafening rock and beer-besotted patrons never goes out of vogue—come say goodbye to a place that carried that tradition for so many good years. ML

SUNDAY 10/31

POISON IDEA, WEHRMACHT, DEFIANCE, RESIST, CEREMONIAL CASTINGS, HAMMERED GRUNTS, SPELLCASTER

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

HAUSU SCREENING: SOFT METALS, REPORTER, JEWELS OF THE NILE, LINGER AND QUIET, MAXX BASS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

HERE WE GO MAGIC

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Readour article on Here We Go Magic.

GANDALF

(Music Millennium, 3158 E Burnside) Attention, nerdlings! 'Tis time to don our finest mithril and put our magical Glamdring swords to whetstone, for Gandalf has returned!... NERD TRAP. Calm down, Bilbo, it is not that Gandalf. This Gandalf is a band, and it's not the '90s-era Finnish death metal band, either. In 1969, a New York psychedelic pop group known as the Rahgoos changed their name to Gandalf and released their only album on Capitol Records. It's a perfect period piece that's sumptuous and delicately trippy. Now founding members Peter Sando and Frank Hubach are getting back together and performing as Gandalf for the first time since the early '70s, at this afternoon's in-store appearance at Music Millennium. Wear your Legolas costume if you must. NL

MONDAY 11/1

MAVIS STAPLES, BILLY BRAGG

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

GARY NUMAN, MOTOR, ADRIAN H AND THE WOUNDS, DJ GHOULUNATIC

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

KATE NASH, PEGGY SUE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Has there been a song in recent memory that more accurately captures a deteriorating realtionship than Kate Nash did with her ubiquitous 2007 single "Foundations"? Well, worry not for Nash, she dodged the one-hit wonder stigma and landed a standup dude—perhaps the "much fitter" one referenced in "Foundations"—in Ryan Jarman from Portland-ish band the Cribs. This year's My Best Friend Is You is anchored by the punchy "Do-Wah-Doo" single, and sounds infinitely more comfortable than her breakthrough Made of Bricks LP. Songs like the straightforward "I've Got a Secret" and following track "Mansion Song" would crumble in less capable hands. The latter starts as a dirty spoken word mantra ("I wanna be fucked and then rolled over, 'cause I'm an independent woman of the 21st century") and evolves into a tribal X-Ray Spex tribute. But that pair of songs is a perfect example of the dichotomy offered by Nash: a modern pop star on her own terms. EAC

THE COATHANGERS, BLOOD BEACH, SONS OF HUNS

(East End, 203 SE Grand) The Coathangers' story is one of stolen drum sets, a rotating set of shrieking voices, and one helluva debut full-length in 2009's Scramble. One of the few recordings to naturally progress from the finer moments of riot grrrl's bratty stomp and stammer, Scramble feels equally at home as a cheeky statement of feminist fury, a soundtrack to a basement dance party, or scoring the band's appearance getting tatted up on LA Ink (really?). Seemingly on tour forever, the Atlanta band has a ferocious live show (the packed house at Dante's during their Scion Garage Fest appearance can attest to that) that will be on display in the intimate underground of East End. EAC

TUESDAY 11/2

Don't forget to vote.

WEDNESDAY 11/3

BEAR IN HEAVEN, LOWER DENS, SUN AIRWAY

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

EMMYLOU HARRIS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) We always knew Emmylou Harris was a class act, but if you needed any further proof, tonight's show is a benefit for the Portland Rescue Mission and the Shepherd's Door Rescue for Women. These ministry centers help homeless people get back on their feet, and it's incredibly generous of Harris to dedicate her time to the local charities' efforts. For this show, she'll be backed by drummer Brian Blade, bassist Chris Thomas, and multi-instrumentalist Greg Leisz—plus Daniel Lanois, the producer who helmed what might be the best album of Harris' career, 1995's Wrecking Ball. Having Lanois, a fine singer/songwriter in his own right, take time out of his busy schedule—he just produced Neil Young's brand-new album Le Noise, and is also getting a new band, Black Dub, under way with Trixie Whitley, daughter of the late Chris Whitley—means that this won't be a typical Emmylou Harris show. With proceeds going towards the missions' efforts, your money couldn't be better spent. NL

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